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Treating Obesity as a Disease

Posted by on Aug 14, 2011 in Articles | 0 comments

Obesity refers to an excess amount of body fat and weight. Most health care providers agree that men with more than 25 percent body fat and women with more than 35 percent body fat are clinically obese. Another measure used is body mass index, with 30 or higher being considered obese. It is estimated that one-third of American adults are either overweight or obese. (more…)

Quitting Tobacco Counts…

Posted by on Aug 14, 2011 in Articles | 0 comments

Within 20 minutes of your last cigarette: your blood pressure drops to normal.

After 8 hours: the oxygen level in your blood returns to normal. After 24 hours: your chance of heart attack decreases.

After 48 hours: your ability to smell and taste is enhanced.

After 72 hours: Your lung capacity increases.

After 1 to 9 months: Your body’s energy level increases.

After 5 years: Heart disease death rate drops same rate for nonsmokers.

 

Source: Sea Mar Community Health Center, WA DOH

Osteoporosis and Osteopenia, The Unnoticed Bone Diseases

Posted by on Aug 14, 2011 in Articles | 0 comments

Osteoporosis is a condition characterized by the progressive decrease in bone density and thinning of bone tissue, which weakens the bones and makes them more likely to fracture. Osteoporosis is the most common type of metabolic bone disease. There are currently an estimated 10 million Americans suffering from osteoporosis as well as another 18 million who have low bone mass, or osteopenia. Researchers estimate that 13–18 percent of American women over the age of 50 have osteoporosis . (more…)

Fibromyalgia Syndrome

Posted by on Aug 14, 2011 in Articles | 0 comments

Fibromyalgia syndrome (FS) affects an estimated 6 to 8 million people. A chronic disorder affecting mostly women, the condition is characterized by wide-spread musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, poor sleeping patterns and multiple tender points that occurs in precise, localized areas, particularly in the neck, spine, shoulders and hips. (more…)

Weigh to Live

Posted by on Aug 14, 2011 in Articles | 0 comments

 

One doesn’t become healthy by losing weight.

Rather, we should strive to become healthy.

Only then is the goal of long-term weight loss achieved.

 

 

WEIGH TO LIVE: A Note from Dr. Rife

Weight gain and weight loss are frequently misunderstood. Mostly we are taught that weight gain is a function of too many calories and too little exercise. While this may be true as a fundamental principle, the conclusions that are often drawn from this equation are incorrect. We do not lose weight for any period of time by reducing calories and we do not lose weight by increasing most forms of exercise. The reasoning behind these two myths is complicated in nature, but fundamentally revolves around hormones and human physiology.

Our bodies are a complex interplay of hormones. Scientists are finding new hormones every year. Even endocrinologists struggle daily to make sense of these interactions. Essentially, though, we need to understand and tame these hormones in order to succeed at losing weight.

Mostly, I see people trying to lose weight by eating less. Unfortunately, by eating less, we increase hormones that both increase our hunger and tell our body that we are in a starvation state. This causes us to be hungry and decrease our metabolism so that we burn fewer calories. It is the general rule, not the exception, that people have to actually eat more to lose weight. The important caveat to eating more is that we have to eat the correct foods in the correct manner. Our bodies are different! SO there is a bit of detective work involved.

‘Weigh to Live’ is not a ‘diet’ that you have tried before to lose weight. Diets don’t work! You already know this if you are like most people who have tried several diets with only limited, long-term success. And it doesn’t make anyone at Puget Sound Family Health happy to see folks lose weight, only to gain it back several months later. Personally, I strive for patients to return one year later, healthier than they were the year before-and every year thereafter. If we change course toward health, we will one day arrive.

Sincerely, Andrew Rife, ND, MEd

 

It’s important to note that ‘Weigh to Live’ is an educational program designed to improve your overall health. Dr. Rife has taught Anatomy & Physiology, Nutrition, and Physical Fitness for over a dozen years. He believes that rather than focusing on weight loss, we should be focusing on achieving overall good health. Weight loss always follows good health practices! And this is a program that is safe for the entire family.

‘Weigh to Live” will help you to discover foods that work well for your body and, more importantly, those that don’t. It will help you to learn the correct pattern for eating to maximize weight loss. And it will help you to understand the correct portion and proportion of foods in your diet. When you make adjustments in these areas the weight will seem to melt away. Once you learn to eat correctly, it is almost impossible to gain the weight back. This is in contrast to many of the ‘diet’ plans on the market that are often harmful, of poor nutritional content, and/or leave you dependent on their processed food products. Nestle owns Jenny Craig. Need we say more?

The ‘Weigh to Live’ program is modular in design. It’s built around a 12 week series of assignments that Dr. Rife routinely utilizes in his private practice. He will not be able to make individual diagnosis or treatments in a group setting. However, depending upon the individual, he will work with your insurance plan to order specific labs and suggest products and exercise routines that will be helpful. In an effort to keep costs down, none of these are mandatory. It is expected that most participants will see improvements in such bio-markers as cholesterol, triglycerides, inflammation, blood sugar and blood pressure. Two Body Impedance Analysis profiles will performed. The ratio of lean body mass to fat will typically improve as well as hydration levels. Both of these markers are excellent signs of improved health. Generally speaking, participants should notice increased mood and decreased anxiety, better sleep, and a lighter sense of being.

 

How does obesity develop?

Overweight refers to an excess amount of body fat and weight. Most health care providers agree that men with more than 25 percent body fat and women with more than 35 percent body fat are clinically obese. Another measure used is body mass index, with 30 or higher being considered obese. It is estimated that one-third of American adults are either overweight or obese.

Although the cause of this imbalance between calories consumed and calories burned differs from person to person, overeating, eating for the wrong metabolic type (resulting in a chronically low metabolic rate) and lack of physical activity are the main factors. Other risk factors include a high sugar diet, psychological factors that cause one to eat when faced with a problem or stressful situation, genetics, environment, gender, age, cigarette smoking, increased alcohol consumption, pregnancy, and illnesses or medical problems. For example, hypothyroidism, Cushing’s syndrome, depression and certain neurological disorders that can lead to overeating can also lead to obesity or a tendency to gain weight. In addition, medications such as steroids and antidepressants may cause a person to gain weight.

Being overweight is more than just a cosmetic concern – it is a serious health hazard. Approximately 280,000 adult deaths in the United States each year are related to obesity. Several serious medical conditions have been linked to obesity, including Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and stroke. Obesity is also linked to higher rates of certain types of cancer in both males and females. Obese men have a marked increase of colon cancer, rectal cancer and prostate cancer. Obese women are more likely to develop cancer of the gallbladder, breast, uterus, cervix and ovaries.

Additional risks of obesity include:

•Gallbladder disease and gallstones
•Liver diseases
•Osteoarthritis
•Gout
•Sleep apnea
•Reproductive problems
•Menstrual irregularities and infertility

 

What are the symptoms of obesity?

Accumulation of excess fat below the diaphragm and in the chest wall may put pressure on the lungs, causing difficulty in breathing and shortness of breath, even with minimal exertion. Difficulty breathing can seriously interfere with sleep and cause sleep apnea, as mentioned above. Obesity may also cause various orthopedic problems, including lower back pain. Osteoarthritis may also get worse, particularly in the hips, knees and ankles. Excessive sweat and swelling in the ankles are also symptoms.

Discover why we believe that Naturopathic Medicine treatments are the best way to treat obesity. The treatment regimens suggested here are based on the experience of North Tacoma Family Health. They do not apply to every case or condition. A person using these recommendations without the aid of a personal physician does so at their own risk. This information is provided for informational purposes only. It is essential to have your condition evaluated by a physician. For an appointment, please call (253) 503-8792 or email us at Contact@PugetSoundFamilyHealth.org

 

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